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“There is not a square inch in the whole domain of our human existence over which Christ, who is Sovereign over all, does not cry, ‘Mine!'” (Abraham Kuyper, 1837-1920)

Dr. Bruce Ashford argues that the Christian has a daily life mission in the world. He writes, “As I see it, we as Christians should live faithfully, critically, and redemptively in the midst of the cultural contexts in which we find ourselves.” In this post I want to apply that statement to the questions we have already asked about popular culture, and I will begin to illustrate it toward the end.

The terms need to be defined before moving on. What does it mean to live faithfully in the world? In these posts, we take faithfully to refer to a heart attitude toward pleasing God by submitting to his rules. What then does it mean to live critically in the world? We apply the term critically in these posts as intelligently discerning whether a given example of popular culture should be accepted or rejected. And, what is meant by living redemptively in the world? In these posts, we take this to mean that Christians should consider how they can live in the world in such a way as to foreshadow God’s restoration of creation and culture in the new heavens and earth.

In these posts there will be no grand aspirations to wrestle our topic into a Rick Flair figure four™. However, we should be able to lay the groundwork for conversing with culture in real life. We will begin here with a series of questions, with the first question taking up the remainder of this post.

The first question is: which is more dangerous: legalism or license? Speaking on the danger of sexual immorality Paul counsels: “‘All things are lawful for me,’ but not all things are helpful. ‘All things are lawful for me,’ but I will not be enslaved by anything” (1 Corinthians 6:12). These words are timely today as well.

This first question concerning legalism and license is a sticky issue, in part, because of confusion over the terms. Because of this, we need to define these terms carefully in order to answer the question.

First, what is meant here by legalism? For the purpose of our discussion, what I mean by legalism is strictly in reference to morality. Therefore it will appear here as moral legalism from this point forward. What is moral legalism then? This will serve to indicate an extreme position where one rules that given questionable components of popular culture are dangerous and should therefore be avoided at all costs. This becomes especially unhealthy when used to bind the consciences of others. We will discuss what moral legalism is not later on (in order to [hopefully] avoid being indifferent about questionable components of pop culture).

Second, what is meant here by license? No, we are not talking about your driver’s license! Here we are talking about an extreme heart attitude toward boundaries where one might believe one has a warrant to imbibe anything and everything in the world in the name of Christian liberty.

I don’t like either extreme. However, I would argue that license to an extreme is more dangerous than moral legalism. The majority of Christians I know (at least at this stage of life) already have well-developed allergies toward moral legalism’s extremes. They find it to be joy robbing and erroneous.

With that in mind, the majority of Christians bounce around somewhere in between these two extremes. It’s an uneasy relationship. In the next post we will develop a middle road with principles gleaned from the Bible. What we will end up with serves to answer the most important question for the Christian life: what does a heart after Jesus look like? The answer to that question helps form what exactly it means to live according to Dr. Ashford’s statement above.

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